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Marple Local History Society Meetings

Meetings

The Society generally meets on the third Monday of the month from September to April, apart from December. the meeting is then  held on the second Monday of the month.

Doors open 7:15pm ready for the meeting at 7:45. Access is via the main entrance on Church Lane (opposite Mount Drive) and the meetings will be held in the church itself on the ground floor.

The church includes a hearing aid loop system which is most effective for people sitting near the side walls and in the rear pews of the church.

Venue and Location

The meetings take place in Marple Methodist Church on Church Lane in Marple.  Postcode: SK6 7AY

Visitors are welcome to attend at a cost of £3. But look below for details of our Membership bargains!

Subscriptions

The annual subscription for the Society is £10 for 8 meetings,so there's a bargain you can take up !

This also allows participation in the Society's trips.

Membership is available at all meetings.

Use the menus on the right to browse our past and present meeting topics.

To park near to Marple Methodist Church

There are double yellow lines immediately outside the church, but there is limited on street parking further up Church Lane on the right hand side, down Empress Avenue and on Mount Drive.

There is a large car park, Chadwick Street Car Park, (SK6 6BY) between Trinity Street  and Chadwick Street, Marple. Access is from Stockport Road onto Trinity Street and from Church Lane onto Chadwick Street, exit is made via Trinity Street, in the direction of Church Lane. It is a pay and display car park, however, at the time of writing, October 2014, parking is free after 6pm.

The location of the Methodist Church  on Church Lane (red marker) is shown on the map below and you can enter your postcode to get directions there, or to the car park Chadwick Street) nearby (blue marker):

 

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15th February: Mike Nevell – Housing in 19th century Manchester

Slum housing was not a unique phenomena of the Industrial Revolution; John Milton had complained about it 200 years before:

“As one who long in populous city pent,
Where houses thick and sewers annoy the air”

However, Manchester in the nineteenth century took slum dwelling to new extremes. No one was more qualified to describe this than Mike Nevell, our speaker. As Head of Archaeology at the University of Salford he has been involved in investigating living conditions across the Manchester region for more than twenty years. With detailed investigations at over 200 sites it is possible to give the human background to the Industrial Revolution.

Read more: 15th February: Mike Nevell – Housing in 19th century Manchester 

21st March: Ruth Colton – Whitworth Park: Pleasure, Play & Politics

Whitworth Park,Ruth Colton, our speaker, arrived in Marple as a newly minted PhD. That very afternoon she had passed her final oral examination and could now call herself “Doctor.” Although she was not able to advise upon the various aches and pains endured by our members she did deliver a fascinating talk on the development and use of Whitworth Park. Her particular interest was in how the children were supposed to use the park and how they actually used it in practice. She had been part of an archaeological team excavating in the park and a lot could be learned from the detritus lost or thrown away over the years. Describing this in the context of the park history brought the subject to life as it contrasted the “top down” influences of the powers that be with the “bottom up” influences forced on the park by the children. The adults might prefer the bandstand and the meandering pathways but the children congregated behind “the Mound” where they could play out of sight of the grown-ups.

Read more: 21st March: Ruth Colton – Whitworth Park: Pleasure, Play & Politics

18th April: AGM & Michael Lambert - History of Brentwood Recuperative Centre, 1937-70

Brentwood on Church Lane with guests relaxing outdoors. We are the Marple Local History Society so you could not have a more local subject than Brentwood – an appropriate end to a memorable season. Brentwood and its residents were an integral part of Marple society for over thirty years and many visitors came to the meeting with experiences and anecdotes to relate. Michael Lambert shared some of his PhD research with us and, in return, we shared with him some of the atmosphere and anecdotes from those days more than half a century ago.

Read more: 18th April: AGM & Michael Lambert - History of  Brentwood Recuperative Centre, 1937-70 

MLHS take All Saints for a walk

Through the gate

all saints

 

Recreating the Apprentice's Walk

 

In May this year, I was asked by Philip Alston, the Children and Families Worker at All Saints Church, to help with a project about Samuel Oldknow, involving two classes from All Saints school.

Together with Philip we assisted teacher Heather Manning to plan the project for Years 1 and 2. It involved the children recreating the apprentices’ walk from Brick Bridge up to the church, climbing over stile at the back of the Churchyard. The children dressed up as apprentices and as you can imagine, a good time was had by all! The weather was kind and the walk was filmed for the DVD that is being produced as part of the Revealing Oldknow’s Legacy project.

Hilary Atkinson

Read more: MLHS take All Saints for a walk

Summer Walks 2016

16 07 18 img 1366 s480A series of summer walks emerged from the AGM questionnaires, which many members completed. These have proved a successful extension to the Society’s ‘season’, outdoor ‘meetings’ in Marple, Marple Bridge and Hayfield. These four walks, in the months from May to August, were led by Hilary Atkinson, Neil Mullineux and Judith Wilshaw. Proving very popular, they may be continued next year.

 

Read more: Summer Walks 2016 

19th. September 2016 : Trafford Park - Paul Callaghan

Paul Callaghan will open up thea group of men employed by Redpath and Brown Engineers in Trafford Park and the photograph was taken in 1925. season, with the story of Trafford Park. Trafford Park has had a central place in the history of industrial Manchester.

This first industrial estate in the world was developed in the outskirts of the city, in the extensive grounds of the de Trafford estate, adjacent to the Manchester Ship Canal. At the heart of the estate was De Trafford Hall, which boasted over 40 bedrooms, servant’ quarters and a private chapel. Unfortunately, the Hall was destroyed by the blitz of 1940.

In 1889 George Westinghouse, set up British Westinghouse, and also built a ‘village’. Over 700 houses were built, along with schools and shops. In the twenty years to 1931 over 300,000 Model T cars were produced in the Ford factory, the first Ford factory outside America.

At its peak in 1945, the park employed 75,000 workers. After a decline in the 1980’s, by 2012, an estimated 1500 companies employed over 56,000 people.

A group of men employed by Redpath and Brown Engineers in Trafford Park and the photograph was taken in 1925.

 

Read more: 19th. September 2016 : Trafford Park - Paul Callaghan

17th. October 2016 : 'St. Martin’s Arts & Crafts Church' - Anthony Burton

St. MartinsSaint Martin's Church is an Anglican church following the traditions of the Anglo-Catholic Oxford Movement.
It was established in 1867 by Mrs Hudson, the lady of Brabyns Hall. Built during the Arts and Crafts era and extended in the Art Nouveau period the church contains works by William Morris, Dante Gabrielle Rosetti, Sir Edward Burne-Jones and Ford Maddox Browne. The Architect was John Dando Sedding. Later extensions feature the work of architect Henry Wilson and includes works by Christopher Whall. St. Martin's, a Grade II listed building, will be the subject of this second talk of the season, delivered by Anthony Burton.

Read more: 17th. October 2016 : 'St. Martin’s Arts & Crafts Church' - Anthony Burton

21st November: 'The Railways of New Mills' - Derek Brumhead

New Mills Newtown Station‘The railway was opened to the public on Saturday last, July 1st. Great numbers of people assembled at New Mills terminus to witness the arrival and departure of the trains. The distance between New Mills and Marple is commonly called ‘a good hour’s walk’, but it is now easily accomplished by ‘Puffin Billy’ in seventeen minutes. Great taste has been displayed, and the comfort of the passengers studied, in the erection of the station house.’ This was how The Glossop Record reported the exciting news of the New Mills Central Station opening on Saturday 8th July 1865. Derek Brumhead, a friend of the Society, will reveal the history of New Mills railways in this month’s talk.

Read more: 21st November: 'The Railways of New Mills' - Derek Brumhead

12th December 2016: 'The Old Vicarage, never a Vicarage' - Ann Hearle

Od Vic b'The Old Vicarage, never a Vicarage'
'A strange title for a talk about a house.
Everybody calls my home, the Old Vicarage but it never was a Vicarage. So what is the history of the house?
From a site occupied for 10,000 years! The house was the Church Inn, then a house lived in by the perpetual curate, next to a home for a family, onto a children's home then back to a private house. A small holding then once again a home for a family.
So what is the story of the site, the house and the hill top? How was the history unravelled? Come and hear on December'

Ann Hearle

Read more: 12th December 2016: 'The Old Vicarage, never a Vicarage' - Ann Hearle

16th January 2017: 'Gorton Monastery' - Clare Mount

Gorton MonasteryThe first thing that Clare Mount did was to disabuse us of the idea that she was to give a talk about a monastery. Just because it was called Gorton Monastery didn’t mean that it was a monastery. No. It was a parish church and a friary but never a monastery. Whatever gave us that idea? We were not alone in our misapprehension. When seven Belgians arrived in 1861 dressed in brown robes it was assumed by the locals that they were monks and the Belgians didn’t have enough command of English to correct them. In fact these eight strangers were Franciscan friars.

Read more: 16th January 2017: 'Gorton Monastery' - Clare Mount

20th February 2017: 'The Lyme Missal' - Neil Mullineux

Lyme Sarum MissalThe story of the Lyme Sarum Missal is more than a history trail of its whereabouts during the past 500 years. It encompasses the history of printing, religion and a great house.

What is a missal? I have to admit that I asked Google. A Missal contains the liturgy for Mass and other orders of worship such as daily prayers, weddings and funerals. The most popular version used in England before the Reformation was the version established by Saint Osmond, Bishop of Salisbury (Sarum) in the 11th Century.

Read more:  20th February 2017:  'The Lyme Missal' - Neil Mullineux

20th March 2017: 'Manchester: Shock City' - Erin Beeston

Liverpool Road Station
Manchester can claim many firsts and one of its more unusual names was “Shock City”, a name coined by Asa Briggs in his classic study “Victorian Cities.” Manchester, during the early 19th century industrialised at such a rapid pace that it was literally shocking for the rest of Britain and the world at large. Its shocking, brutal, nature is what inspired Marx and Engels towards their critique of capitalism at large. Briggs, however, was referring to its leading role in the industrial revolution which in turn made it a pioneer in the rapid emergence of new technologies, new social structures and new political configurations. Above all it was a test bed for the interactions between these technical and social forces, the conflicts and the opening of new possibilities.

Read more: 20th March 2017:  'Manchester: Shock City' - Erin Beeston