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Marple Local History Society Meetings

Meetings

The Society generally meets on the third Monday of the month from September to April, apart from December. the meeting is then  held on the second Monday of the month.

Doors open 7:15pm ready for the meeting at 7:45. Access is via the main entrance on Church Lane (opposite Mount Drive) and the meetings will be held in the church itself on the ground floor.

The church includes a hearing aid loop system which is most effective for people sitting near the side walls and in the rear pews of the church.

Venue and Location

The meetings take place in Marple Methodist Church on Church Lane in Marple.  Postcode: SK6 7AY

Visitors are welcome to attend at a cost of £3. But look below for details of our Membership bargains!

Subscriptions

The annual subscription for the Society is £10 for 8 meetings,so there's a bargain you can take up !

This also allows participation in the Society's trips.

Membership is available at all meetings.

Use the menus on the right to browse our past and present meeting topics.

To park near to Marple Methodist Church

There are double yellow lines immediately outside the church, but there is limited on street parking further up Church Lane on the right hand side, down Empress Avenue and on Mount Drive.

There is a large car park, Chadwick Street Car Park, (SK6 6BY) between Trinity Street  and Chadwick Street, Marple. Access is from Stockport Road onto Trinity Street and from Church Lane onto Chadwick Street, exit is made via Trinity Street, in the direction of Church Lane. It is a pay and display car park, however, at the time of writing, October 2014, parking is free after 6pm.

The location of the Methodist Church  on Church Lane (red marker) is shown on the map below and you can enter your postcode to get directions there, or to the car park Chadwick Street) nearby (blue marker):

 

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16th January 2017: 'Gorton Monastery' - Clare Mount

Gorton MonasteryThe first thing that Clare Mount did was to disabuse us of the idea that she was to give a talk about a monastery. Just because it was called Gorton Monastery didn’t mean that it was a monastery. No. It was a parish church and a friary but never a monastery. Whatever gave us that idea? We were not alone in our misapprehension. When seven Belgians arrived in 1861 dressed in brown robes it was assumed by the locals that they were monks and the Belgians didn’t have enough command of English to correct them. In fact these eight strangers were Franciscan friars.

Read more: 16th January 2017: 'Gorton Monastery' - Clare Mount

20th February 2017: 'The Lyme Missal' - Neil Mullineux

Lyme Sarum MissalThe story of the Lyme Sarum Missal is more than a history trail of its whereabouts during the past 500 years. It encompasses the history of printing, religion and a great house.

What is a missal? I have to admit that I asked Google. A Missal contains the liturgy for Mass and other orders of worship such as daily prayers, weddings and funerals. The most popular version used in England before the Reformation was the version established by Saint Osmond, Bishop of Salisbury (Sarum) in the 11th Century.

Read more:  20th February 2017:  'The Lyme Missal' - Neil Mullineux

21st November: 'The Railways of New Mills' - Derek Brumhead

New Mills Newtown Station‘The railway was opened to the public on Saturday last, July 1st. Great numbers of people assembled at New Mills terminus to witness the arrival and departure of the trains. The distance between New Mills and Marple is commonly called ‘a good hour’s walk’, but it is now easily accomplished by ‘Puffin Billy’ in seventeen minutes. Great taste has been displayed, and the comfort of the passengers studied, in the erection of the station house.’ This was how The Glossop Record reported the exciting news of the New Mills Central Station opening on Saturday 8th July 1865. Derek Brumhead, a friend of the Society, will reveal the history of New Mills railways in this month’s talk.

Read more: 21st November: 'The Railways of New Mills' - Derek Brumhead

12th December 2016: 'The Old Vicarage, never a Vicarage' - Ann Hearle

Od Vic b'The Old Vicarage, never a Vicarage'
'A strange title for a talk about a house.
Everybody calls my home, the Old Vicarage but it never was a Vicarage. So what is the history of the house?
From a site occupied for 10,000 years! The house was the Church Inn, then a house lived in by the perpetual curate, next to a home for a family, onto a children's home then back to a private house. A small holding then once again a home for a family.
So what is the story of the site, the house and the hill top? How was the history unravelled? Come and hear on December'

Ann Hearle

Read more: 12th December 2016: 'The Old Vicarage, never a Vicarage' - Ann Hearle

17th. October 2016 : 'St. Martin’s Arts & Crafts Church' - Anthony Burton

St. MartinsSaint Martin's Church is an Anglican church following the traditions of the Anglo-Catholic Oxford Movement.
It was established in 1867 by Mrs Hudson, the lady of Brabyns Hall. Built during the Arts and Crafts era and extended in the Art Nouveau period the church contains works by William Morris, Dante Gabrielle Rosetti, Sir Edward Burne-Jones and Ford Maddox Browne. The Architect was John Dando Sedding. Later extensions feature the work of architect Henry Wilson and includes works by Christopher Whall. St. Martin's, a Grade II listed building, will be the subject of this second talk of the season, delivered by Anthony Burton.

Read more: 17th. October 2016 : 'St. Martin’s Arts & Crafts Church' - Anthony Burton