Header

At a glance: Meetings 2021 - 2022 Season

Queen Victoria 1897

Hayfield bomb damage, 1942 in Derbyshire - Credit: Archant

Season 2021 - 2022

  • 20th September:  David Skillen - 'Bentley Boys'
  • 18th October: Andy Smith -  'Living & working in Antartica'
  • 15th November: Andrew Simcock - 'The story of the Pankhurst Statue'
  • 13th December (2nd Mon.): Craig Wright - 'A History of Rose Hill Station'
  • 17th January:  Frank Pleszak -  'Second World War bombing of New Mills and Hayfield'
  • 21st February: David Kitching - 'The history of Norbury Colliery'
  • 21st March:  Anthony Burton - 'Marple 1870-1930: 'A Favourite and Ideal Holiday Resort '
  • 25thApril:  AGM &  Prof. Hannah Barker - ‘History through objects: what samplers tell us about the past’

Rose Hill Station: a history - Craig Wright (Dec. 2021)

Rose hill staition Xmas timeIt rained all day and, as evening approached it rained even more. Nevertheless, a hard core of history buffs together with some railway enthusiasts as guests, made up an audience of over seventy people to listen to Craig Wright talk about Rose Hill station. An impressive turnout in the middle of a pandemic. First, he had to prove his credentials to a dedicated audience. Craig comes from a family that has been involved in railways from his 2x great grandfather onwards. The progenitor of the tradition was originally an agricultural labourer who had recognised the tide of history, left his job and walked to Derby where he got a job with the growth industry of that era. He rose as the railways grew and finished his career as a station master.[click Derby Station 1906]

Rose Hill Station, Santa is on his way (click on image to see the 1954 station)

Read more: Rose Hill Station: a history - Craig Wright (Dec. 2021)

Next Meeting: Frank Pleszak - 'Second World War bombing of New Mills and Hayfield'

Hayfield bomb damage

Hayfield bomb damage, 1942 in Derbyshire - Credit: Archant

On the evening of January 17th Frank Pleszak will be the describing the events of July 3rd 1942, the day of an air raid on New Mills and Hayfield.

During WW2, few areas of the UK were spared from Luftwaffe bombing. The High Peak of Derbyshire was no exception - most the result of German aircrews jettisoning unused bombs as they fled home. But on that Friday evening of 1942, a daring raid occured that brough havoc to two innocent High Peak villages which had until that point, not been witness to the terrors of war.

Further reading:
The Blitz Around Britain from the IWM website

Meeting Details: At Marple Methodist Church, SK6 7AY 

Doors open 7:15pm ready for the meeting at 7:45pm

For the full list of the talks this season visit list

Significant Manchester Women - Andrew Simcock (Nov. 2021)

Pankhurtst StatueThe November talk was the story of a statue. Not just any statue but the statue of Emmeline Pankhurst, the iconic figure symbolising the fight for universal suffrage. And how fitting that she should be commemorated in Manchester, the city of her birth. Andrew Simcock took us through the various stages from conception to completion after introducing himself as a Manchester councillor for Didsbury East.

Read more:  Significant Manchester Women - Andrew Simcock (Nov. 2021)

Antarctica - Andy Smith (Oct. 2021)

antar 28Andy Smith began his talk on Antarctica by listing some superlatives for the seventh continent; perhaps we should examine some of them:

the coldest
No dispute there. The average temperature at Halley Research Station is -6.6⁰C - and that’s in summer! In winter the average is a chilly -28⁰C. And Halley Research Station is on the coast. If you want to know inland temperatures they would typically be -20⁰C in summer and, in winter, a bracing -60⁰C.

the driest
Precipitation is usually snow in the form of ‘diamond dust’ - tiny ice crystals formed from water vapour. Halley gets about 250 mm each year but the interior would get less than 50mm. This compares with about 600mm in London and 1050mm in Manchester. So yes, it is dry.

the windiest

The strong winds are the result of katabatic winds which arise when cold, dense air flows down towards the coast under gravity. Across much of the interior these winds average about 10 mph but towards the edge of the continent slope gradients become steeper. In some places the average annual wind velocity is nearly 50 mph.

Read more:  Antarctica - Andy Smith (Oct. 2021) 

Bentley Boys - David Skillen (Sept. 2021)

Flappers1920s 58a346bd3df78c4758d56c59It is always a little tense preparing for the first meeting of the year. Have we forgotten anything after a three month break? Will the new season be as good as last year? Will there be as many members? And the first meeting of the year this time was different from usual. It was the first meeting after eighteen months, not just three months. To cap it all we had a subject that was rather different from the usual programme - The Bentley Boys. Yes, it was history. It was a story of the Jazz Age, the Roaring Twenties, when “Anything Goes”. Would our members be interested in this aspect of history?

Pre-Covid we would expect to have over a hundred people at an average meeting. The first meeting of the year is normally less than that, say 80 or 90, because people are on holiday or away for other reasons. But Covid had changed the environment. Were some people still suffering after effects of the virus? Would people want to come to an indoor meeting? We took soundings and decided that we hoped we would

Read more:  Bentley Boys - David Skillen (Sept. 2021)