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Marple Local History Society Meetings

Meetings

The Society generally meets on the third Monday of the month from September to April, apart from December. the meeting is then  held on the second Monday of the month.

Doors open 7:15pm ready for the meeting at 7:45. Access is via the main entrance on Church Lane (opposite Mount Drive) and the meetings will be held in the church itself on the ground floor.

The church includes a hearing aid loop system which is most effective for people sitting near the side walls and in the rear pews of the church.

Venue and Location

The meetings take place in Marple Methodist Church on Church Lane in Marple.  Postcode: SK6 7AY

Visitors are welcome to attend at a cost of £3. But look below for details of our Membership bargains!

Subscriptions

The annual subscription for the Society is £10 for 8 meetings,so there's a bargain you can take up !

This also allows participation in the Society's trips.

Membership is available at all meetings.

Use the menus on the right to browse our past and present meeting topics.

To park near to Marple Methodist Church

There are double yellow lines immediately outside the church, but there is limited on street parking further up Church Lane on the right hand side, down Empress Avenue and on Mount Drive.

There is a large car park, Chadwick Street Car Park, (SK6 6BY) between Trinity Street  and Chadwick Street, Marple. Access is from Stockport Road onto Trinity Street and from Church Lane onto Chadwick Street, exit is made via Trinity Street, in the direction of Church Lane. It is a pay and display car park, however, at the time of writing, October 2014, parking is free after 6pm.

The location of the Methodist Church  on Church Lane (red marker) is shown on the map below and you can enter your postcode to get directions there, or to the car park Chadwick Street) nearby (blue marker):

 

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Sept. '17 : Peter Wadsworth – ‘Strawberry Studios’

Strawberry Studios

Queues formed, money paid, forms filled, music heard, history told, tea taken doors locked, good night.

The evening in a sentence, but what lies behind those words? Yes, it was that September time again, not back to school for those that trooped into the foyer of the church, that was long ago, but a time to pay for membership or a visit, renew or join, cheque or cash.

Over ninety people sat down and faced the front. Are you sitting comfortably? Then the evening can begin. Chairman Ann Hearle welcomed members both old and new and introduced our speaker, Peter Wadsworth.

Read more: Sept. '17 : Peter Wadsworth – ‘Strawberry Studios’ 

Next Meeting

‘STORM Gathers in Mellor!’ with Bob Humphrey-Taylor

Mellor Mill

So what, you might very well ask, is STORM? Bob Humphrey -Taylor,chairman of Mellor Archaeological Trust (MAT), will explain how the Trust is involved as the lead organisation in the UK, involved in a Europe wide initiative to reduce the impact of climate change, natural hazards and human actions on heritage.

The project STORM (Safeguarding Cultural Heritage through Technical and Organisational Resources Management), involves the use of predictive models and non-destructive methods of survey and diagnosis to predict environmental changes and to reveal the threats and conditions that may damage our cultural heritage sites. The budget for the project is 7.2 million Euros. It brings together partners from Italy, Portugal, Greece, Turkey and the United Kingdom. This project finishes in May 2019.

 The one UK site is at Mellor, comprises of the Iron Age Ditch at the Old Vicarage, the bronze age burial ground on Shaw Cairn and Mellor Mill in the Goyt Valley.

Dec. '18: ‘Belle Vue - A History’ - Frank Rhodes & Brian Selby

Bele VueMemories were stirred but not shaken. Such was the promise of an evening of Belle Vue to the members…..and visitors.

Brian Selby and Frank Rhodes told the story of Belle Vue's circus, speedway, boxing, rollercoasters, fireworks, zoo – from 1848 Belle Vue attracted visitors from all over the north with its unique combination of leisure activities.

Originally Belle Vue Zoological Gardens, the brainchild of entrepreneur and part-time gardener John Jennison, were meant to be an enjoyable pastime for the middle classes; however they very quickly became one of the North West's biggest attractions. At its peak, Belle Vue occupied 165 acres and attracted more than two million visitors a year, but the zoo closed in 1977 due to financial difficulties, and the site was finally cleared in 1987.

above: People queuing for the Bobs Coaster at Belle Vue Gardens, Manchester, 1968 (Photo: Marshall Collection / Chetham’s Library online archive)

Oct. '18: Julie Bagnall - ‘What to do with 323 postcards’

Cissie and Bella coverThe question posed by Julie Bagnall was what to do with 323 postcards and she regaled us this evening with the many and various things she had done with them.

Her first task was to justify to her husband why she had bought this dog-eared album at a car boot sale in 1992. He was told it was none of his business and when he enquired about the price that was a confidential matter. However, the album was squirrelled away for a couple of years on the basis of “out of sight, out of mind.”

When they next saw the light of day, Julie decided to count them, which is how she came to the total of 323. But they were not all postcards. Most were, either used (written and posted) or unused, but there were also pictures and some clippings....

Read more: Oct. '18: Julie Bagnall - ‘What to do with 323 postcards’ 

Nov. '18: ‘A 1920s Bleaching, Dyeing and Weaving Mill’ - Judith Atkinson

Burgess Ledward's Wardley MilIn March 2015, Judith Atkinson gave us a fascinating and entertaining insight into the building of the ‘Big Ditch’ - the Manchester Ship Canal, using a remarkable collection of glass slides. This evening, Judith excelled again, using an album of photographs that had narrowly missed being discarded in a skip to illustrate her talk about the working life of the Burgess-Ledward mill at Walkden.

left: The interior of Burgess Ledward's Wardley Mill

Read more:  Nov. '18:  ‘A 1920s Bleaching, Dyeing and Weaving Mill’ - Judith Atkinson 

Sept. '18 : Michael Ogden - 'Hotels in the Sky'

‘Hotels in the Sky - History of Zeppelins’ with Mike Ogden

Zepp PhotoIn the opening presentation of the season, using both photographs and film of the period, Michael Ogden told us of the fascinating story of a lost technology, and a long forgotten way to travel the world

During the early years post the First World War,  very few thought the aeroplanes would ever develop into a safe, efficient and affordable way to travel long-distances. The first airliners had only a short range – 500 miles at most – though that was probably plenty for the passengers because they were uncomfortable, cold, noisy, far from reliable -- and not very safe either.

What a contrast with airships, especially Zeppelins! They could cruise for thousands of miles, carrying more passengers in far greater comfort than aeroplanes. They had kitchens and toilets and, on trans-ocean flights, cabins and showers as well. They were a little slower than airliners but, more importantly, they were two or three times faster than the ocean liners they were competing against.

Read more: Sept. '18 : Michael Ogden - 'Hotels in the Sky'