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Postcards Pt. 4 - December 2019

Winter Hibbert LaneThis part of Hibbert Lane may have been classed as Hawk Green when the postcard was published but it is now definitely in Marple. The wall and gateposts in the foreground belong to a substantial house, Stoke Lacy, which was built after the 1891 census was completed and before the1901 census was taken. William Chapman (Superintendent Railway Goods Depot) and his wife Adelaide lived there in 1901 together with 3 servants. In 1911, Henry Forth (agent and employer - aniline dyes & chemicals) and his wife Annabella were there with daughter Irene and 2 servants. We also know that there were 12 rooms, which included the kitchen but excluded the scullery, bathroom and water closet. The gates in the distance belong to Cotefield or Yately.

Read more: Postcards Pt. 4 -  December 2019

Postcards 3

 firstPostmarked 1910, Marple Station Ambulance Class. We do not know their names or what work they did. 4 years later, some of these men would enlist to fight for ‘king and country’. At the height of Marple Station’s operation, the Station Master was in charge of a staff of 40, with 15 men on duty at any one time. Each day up to 250 trains were using the line. About half stopped at the station and it was possible to catch direct trains from Marple to London Marylebone or St Pancras. Link to railway photos. If you are interested in learning more, Society member, Neil Mullineux has written a book: Marple and the railways price £4. link to publications page

Read more: Postcards 3

Postcards pt.2

A few months ago, Ann Hearle generously donated her collection of local postcards to the Society. Collected over 40 years, there are more than 1000 cards, most of which date from the early 1900s. Some are postmarked but many are not and, similarly, some have messages but others don’t. Postcards were very popular in the early 1900s and Ann’s collection includes examples from more than 13 publishers including Kennerley Photographer from Marple Bridge and Raphael Tuck & Sons, Art Publishers to their majesties The King and Queen (Edward & Alexandra) who were based in the City of London. Postcards were sold through local shops and often included the shop name e.g. T W Waterhouse of the Post Office, Rowarth and M H Moore Stationers, Marple.

Many images are already shared on the Virtual Tour of Marple which Mark Whittaker runs via the Marple website, but many are new to us. The Virtual Tour can also be accessed from the MLHS website. Here are some postcards, which I hope you find interesting. Thanks to our President, Ann Hearle.

(above) Mrs Edwards of Stonehurst with her daughters and friends

Read more: Postcards  pt.2

Making One’s Mark

 apr2015 h08 chauvetcaveA human handprint made about 30,000 years ago, on the wall of the Chauvet-Pont-d’Arc Cave in southern France. Somebody tried to say, “I was here!” but of course, with no written language, this person just made his Mark which the cave painters did more artistically.

The picture and text are taken from the book “Sapiens” by Yuval Noah Harari. We do not know the sex of this Homo Sapiens person but I am guessing that a man would be more probably engaged in wanting to make his Mark.

At this time our ancestors had developed language and I wonder whether they had their own names. I would like to give our hand printer a name and I have decided on Denis. The Neanderthals and Denisovans were two other human species who have left their DNA mark in Homo Sapiens today. The Denisovans (from the east) are not likely to be represented in our handprint man but I took my choice of a name from them. Just by chance I found that Denis was the first bishop of Paris and is the Patron Saint of France! Then, by another chance, I found that the name Denis is a derivation of Dionysos, the Greek god of wine and revelry - a good name then for a bishop!

Read more: Making One’s Mark 

Postcards pt.1

 Lych Gates of St Martin's Church A few months ago, Ann Hearle generously donated her collection of local postcards to the Society. Collected over 40 years, there are more than 1000 cards, most of which date from the early 1900s. Some are postmarked but many are not and, similarly, some have messages but others don’t. Postcards were very popular in the early 1900s and Ann’s collection includes examples from more than 13 publishers including Kennerley Photographer from Marple Bridge and Raphael Tuck & Sons, Art Publishers to their majesties The King and Queen (Edward & Alexandra) who were based in the City of London. Postcards were sold through local shops and often included the shop name e.g. T W Waterhouse of the Post Office, Rowarth and M H Moore Stationers, Marple.

Many images are already shared on the Virtual Tour of Marple which Mark Whittaker runs via the Marple website, but many are new to us. The Virtual Tour can also be accessed from the MLHS website. Here are some postcards, which I hope you find interesting. Thanks to our President, Ann Hearle.

(above) A hand-coloured version of a postcard showing the Lych Gates of St Martin's Church on Brabyns Brow.

Read more: Postcards pt.1

A Glimpse of 19th Century Crime and Punishment in Marple

Marple Parish Magazine 1892/3 gave extracts from reports of Court proceedings at Chester Assizes in 1824 detailing two crimes committed in Marple. The first was published in “The Morning Herald,” London, 16th April 1824 . A brief description can be seen on our website but below is a summarised account;

Before the Chief Justice Warren and Mr Justice Jervis

William Jones was indicted for sacrilegiously breaking into the Chapel of All Saints at Marple and stealing a quantity of bibles and prayer books. A chapel window had been broken. Mr Eccles and Mr Isherwood gave evidence of having lost such books.

Read more: A Glimpse of 19th Century Crime and Punishment in Marple 

A Moment in Time

Close Hartle familyThis wonderful photograph, taken around 1902, records four generations of Margaret Davenport’s family. Margaret was born in Marple and recently celebrated her 90th birthday.
Her grandparents George and Ruth Close are standing at the back of the photograph (Ruth wearing a dark top). Sitting in front of them are Ruth’s parents, John and Julia Hartle. The two young ladies are Ruth’s sisters, Sarah Anne and Martha. Sitting on great great grandmother Hartle’s knee is Frederick, born in 1901, the eldest child of George and Ruth. Frederick (Margaret’s uncle) was the eldest of eleven children, nine of whom survived to adulthood. I suspect that this photograph was taken at his christening.

Read more: A Moment in Time 

Nothing New Under The Sun

court scene2018 marks the centenary of some (but not all) women getting the vote but the battle for equal treatment with men had started well over a hundred years before that. Earlier this year I spoke with Val Dingle who has spent over 20 years researching her Chatterton ancestors who were land and property owners living in Mellor and Marple in the 18th and 19th centuries. Legal documents including wills have revealed some interesting stories. In particular, Val is intrigued by Peggy (née Chatterton) (1754-1815), a cousin and second wife of William Chatterton (c1738 – 1817), who claimed her rights more than a century before 1918.

Read more: Nothing New Under The Sun 

1911 Coronation Celebrations

Coronation 1911Three days of celebration marked the Coronation of King George V and Queen Mary. On Saturday, 22nd June 1911, the King and his consort were crowned at Westminster Abbey. Some 45,000 soldiers and sailors from across the Empire either participated in the procession or lined the route.

The next day, the return procession was reconstituted for a further extended parade though the streets of London. It travelled along the Strand into the City of London, passing St Paul’s Cathedral, across the Thames by London Bridge, back over Westminster Bridge. Finally returning along The Mall to Buckingham Palace.

Read more: 1911 Coronation Celebrations  

William Henry Chadwick: Chartist & Mesmerist

rose brow compstall 2William Henry Chadwick – a 19th century local lad who made a name for himself

This story is a result of researching the history of the above in response to a request from Christopher White, from Romiley, who now lives in France. William Henry was his gt gt gt grandfather.

William (not Henry then) was born in 1829, son of Jeremiah Chadwick (from Marple) and his wife, Rachel (nee Prosser). The family lived in Compstall Bridge but the children were baptized in Marple Bridge.

During his childhood William would become increasingly aware of Chartism, the working class movement for political reform which presented  petitions  to the House of Commons, signed by thousands of people. In the North West of England industrialisation had led to terrible conditions and poor pay in mills and factories –even children could be working a 12 hour day.

Read more: William Henry Chadwick: Chartist & Mesmerist

A Family Face

Ernest Bennett V2Most Marple people will have seen the time line in the Memorial Park with details and photos of the many local young men who lost their lives in World War I – a very poignant reminder of the heartbreak endured by their families from 1914-1918.

One brave young man, whose name went up this year, caught my attention. This was Ernest Bennett D.C.M., parents Sam and Mary from High Lane. Although my maiden name was Bennett the name Ernest, with parents Sam and Mary, meant nothing to me. As far as I knew there was no Ernest in my Bennett family records.

Read more: A Family Face

What's in a name ?

Agatha ChristieWhat’s in a name? Well, quite a lot if your name is Miss Jane Marple, Agatha Christie’s eponymous heroine. The star of 12 crime novels and 20 short stories, local folklore believed that Agatha Christie’s amateur sleuth was named after Marple station because the author passed through it on one occasion. This is not true but the station does figure prominently in the actual story. In July 2015 the station celebrated its 150th anniversary (coincidentally, the 125th anniversary of Agatha’s birth) and her grandson Mathew Prichard was invited to Marple. He brought with him a letter written by his grandmother to a Miss Marple fan, explaining how she came by the name.

 

Read more: What's in a name ?

William Hyde - a man of all trades

Church Photo 1aThis wonderful image is of William Hyde who was born in Denton in 1801. He was sexton of All Saints Church, Marple for 42 years until his death in 1865. During that time, a sexton was a ‘man of all trades’ as the role included grave digging, clerk and maintenance of the church.

Samuel Oldknow’s Georgian Church replaced an older and much smaller wooden church. It was perched on Marple Ridge at the heart of a small isolated group of buildings set amongst pastures and lying beside the long-established route between Marple and Disley. Nowadays, we do not associate the area around the church as being ‘The Ridge’ but that is how the land between the Church and Hill Top Farm is designated on old maps. ...........................

Read more:  William Hyde - a man of all trades